Shops of Yesteryear

On this page we will build up a collection of shops that once traded in our towns High Streets and Estates. Some well known shops, like Kirman’s Ironmongers and the S & G Stores have been given there own page as too has Elses Newagents in Ashby, we will endevour to add more.

Not so much a shop but Spavin's Garage on Cottage Beck Road in 1932.

Not so much a shop but Spavin’s Garage on Cottage Beck Road in 1932 (today a new Betfred Bookmakers has recently been built on the site). Jack Spavin is to the right and Rusty Mason to the left. Rusty took over this site in 1938 and set up Rusty’s whilst Jack Spavin moved to Ashby Turn (now the site of a Tesco Express) however the outbreak of World War 2  and the introduction of petrol rationing saw Spavin struggle. He went to work for Marshall’s mending search lights before going to Manchester for a while and then returning to Scunthorpe and setting up business on Moorwell Road in 1942. Rusty’s and Spavin’s still trade in Scunthorpe today.

fodingham-road-c1959

Frodingham Road c1960 – F.H. Wright on the right, Chemist in the centre and Jackson’s on the corner of Porter Street.

Avenue Vivian

David Todd’s Grocery & General Store on Avenue Vivian

Suggs u1

Sugg Sports and Radio, High Street, Scunthorpe, c 1958. The High Street branch of Sugg Sports in Scunthorpe, showing some electrical goods and adverts to either rent or buy. Three RAF men are interested in these, whilst the left hand window has a more general selection of sports goods. Frank Howe Sugg (1862-1933) was one of the few sportsmen to achieve a ‘Derbyshire double’, to have played at least one first team game for both Derbyshire County Cricket Club and Derby County Football Club. Well known throughout the sporting word, he later became an umpire after his playing career ended and formed Sugg Sports in 1888. The business was a great success and was a leading supplier of football, cricket and fishing equipment. A second was located on nearby Gilliatt Street.

Spavin's Garage at Ashby Turn in 1938, now the site of a Tesco Express

Spavin’s Garage at Ashby Turn in 1938, now the site of a Tesco Express

chapel-street-early-1960s

Parker & White on Chapel Street (at the top of Market Hill). It sold British and foreign government surplus stock including duffel coats, boiler suits and donkey jackets. It was demolished in autumn 1964 to make way for the redevelopment of the area. Further along is The Lord Roberts Hotel which is still going strong today.

beechway-shops-early-1950s-c

Beechway Shopping Parade in the early 1950’s shortly after construction. Shops included Duffelens Chemist, Drinkwater’s Hairdressers, Mumby’s Bakers, Simms Florists, Co-op, Fisher’s Butchers, Radio Rentals, Clixby’s and Hitchins fish & Chip shop.

 

Woolsey Daddlers & Harness Makers taken around 1920. The shop was at the lower end of Scunthorpe High Street, almost opposite Home Street.

Woolsey Saddlers & Harness Makers taken around 1920. The shop was at the lower end of Scunthorpe High Street, almost opposite Home Street.

Mr Podmore's butchers shop on Scunthorpe High Street, it was later purchased by Dick Long. It was situated between the bus station and Cole Street. The photo shows Tom Pinder the errand boy on the left, Tom Fisher, Dick Long, Mr. Podmore and on the right Herbert Clayton, another errand boy.

The Colonial & American butchers at the lower end of Scunthorpe High Street in the 1920’s

Mr Podmore's butchers shop on Scunthorpe High Street, it was later purchased by Dick Long. It was situated between the bus station and Cole Street. The photo shows Tom Pinder the errand boy on the left, Tom Fisher, Dick Long, Mr. Podmore and on the right Herbert Clayton, another errand boy.

Mr Podmore’s butchers shop on Scunthorpe High Street, it was later purchased by Dick Long. It was situated between the bus station and Cole Street. The photo shows Tom Pinder the errand boy on the left, Tom Fisher, Dick Long, Mr. Podmore and on the right Herbert Clayton, another errand boy. Tom Fisher went on to open his own butchery (see below) and Hertbert Clayton started a drapery business.

Tom Fisher's Butchers Shop on Scunthorpe High Street with T H Fisher & Sons van parked outside.  Tom Fisher had acquired the shop from a German called Karl who was interned during World War One.  The Fisher family also had a cake stall next door and had the Mazarz Cafe upstairs (which later became Elysees hairdressers).  In the shop window pork sausage is proced at 1/- per pound (1 shilling, now 5p).

Tom Fisher’s Butchers Shop on Scunthorpe High Street with T H Fisher & Sons van parked outside.
Tom Fisher had acquired the shop from a German called Karl who was interned during World War One.
The Fisher family also had a cake stall next door and had the Mazarz Cafe upstairs (which later became Elysees hairdressers).
In the shop window pork sausage is proced at 1/- per pound (1 shilling, now 5p).

Tom Fisher's butchers at 72 Scunthorpe High Street - between Market Hill and Wells Street.

Tom Fisher’s butchers at 72 Scunthorpe High Street – between Market Hill and Wells Street. Tom Fisher is on the left.

Donners Pork butchers

A postcard sent from Scunthorpe with a postmark of August 1904 of Thomas M. Donner (1854-1909) in the doorway of his pork butcher’s shop at 91 High Street, Scunthorpe.

Hatfields Ravendale Street

Hatfield’s supermarket on Ravendale Street North in 1980

Halford's cycle shop at 94 Scunthorpe High Street taken some time after 1926. The company was formed as a local hardware store by Mr FW Rushbrooke in Birmingham in 1892, by 1910 they had over 100 branches throught the country.

Halford’s cycle shop at 94 Scunthorpe High Street taken some time after 1926. The company was formed as a local hardware store by Mr FW Rushbrooke in Birmingham in 1892, by 1910 they had over 100 branches throught the country.

Bells Modern Grocers had this prominent position on the corner of Scunthorpe High Street and Market Hill. It later became Melia's grocers shop.

Bells Modern Grocers had this prominent position on the corner of Scunthorpe High Street and Market Hill. It later became Melia’s grocers shop.

Alfred Read's confectionary stall in the new Market Hall which was opened by Scuntorpe Urban District Council in 1906. He also had a shop at 146 Scunthorpe High Street.

Alfred Read’s confectionary stall in the new Market Hall which was opened by Scuntorpe Urban District Council in 1906. He also had a shop at 146 Scunthorpe High Street.

Dennis Booth's Pharmacy which was situated in Old Brumby, at the junction of Ashby Road and Rivelin Road. He retired and sold the shop in 1994 after 31 years of being there.

Dennis Booth’s Pharmacy which was situated in Old Brumby, at the junction of Ashby Road and Rivelin Road. He retired and sold the shop in 1994 after 31 years of being there.

Bennet's Cycle Shop and NSS Newagents which was situated opposite Ashby Market.

Bennett’s Cycle Shop and NSS Newsagents which was situated opposite Ashby Market.

Doncaster Road c1970

Doncaster Road in the early 1970’s showing the Pashley and Dale furnishings shop, Royal London Insurance Society Ltd and he Continental hairdressers and further along on the corner with Deyne Avenue is the YMCA.

Ashby Broadway 1960s

A view of Broadway, Ashby in the 1960’s. The Fine Fare Supermarket closed in the 1980’s and for a short period the unit became Shoppers Paradise trading in cheap foodstuffs, it is now occupied by Iceland – the Yorkshire Bank to the right closed its’ Ashby branch in 2015.

 

A view along Scunthorpe High Street in 1986. Shops include Indigo clothes shop, Jacksons supermarket and The Mint public house. Across from here Greenwoods menswear can be seen.

A view along Scunthorpe High Street in 1986. Shops include Indigo clothes shop, Jacksons supermarket and The Mint public house. Across from here Greenwoods menswear can be seen.

Madoc Book Supplies and Golden Fry chip shop on Ashby High Street. Behind this row of shops stood Mackender's Builders Yard, the shop and builders yard were cleared and housing built called Mackender  Court.

Madoc Book Supplies and Golden Fry chip shop on Ashby High Street. Behind this row of shops stood Mackender’s Builders Yard, the shop and builders yard were cleared and housing built called Mackender Court.

In this turn of the 21st centuary view of Britannia Corner there have been slight changes, The Britannia pub has now becme a nightclub, the Blue Bell )which opened in 1999 can be seen on the left whilst Sims Flowers shop has moved and the premises are now an Estate Agents.

In this turn of the 21st centuary view of Britannia Corner there have been slight changes, The Britannia pub has now becme a nightclub, the Blue Bell )which opened in 1999 can be seen on the left whilst Sims Flowers shop has moved and the premises are now an Estate Agents.

Westcliff precicnt1

Westcliff Precinct during more affluent times.

Although this photograph focuses on the bus it gives a great view of shop along Scunthorpe High Street on 9th October 1978 - this part of the High Street is now pedestrianised.

Although this photograph focuses on the bus it gives a great view of shop along Scunthorpe High Street on 9th October 1978 – this part of the High Street is now pedestrianised. To the right, just out of view, is The Army Stores followed by Ray Alan’s then Blaskey’s wallpaper shop, further up to the rear of the bus is Tandy the electrical retail shop.

Timpson's on High Street

A view similar to the one above but this time looking in the opposite direction 2 years later in 1980

high street 2

Another view similar to the one above only this time taken c1913. Munro’s dress shop on the left was later occupied by the Abbey National Building Society and currently Santander Bank. The building to the right is the Oswald Hotel – still seen with its garden wall outside – the pub opened in 1895 and was extended in 1899, a date stone on the side of the roof extension symbolises this.

Asby Broadway in 1982. Shops include Greenwoods Menswear, Midland Bank, Ashe & Nephew  Off-Licence, Cardinal, Alan Betts Butchers and Woolworth to name but a few.

Asby Broadway in 1982. Shops include Greenwoods Menswear, Midland Bank, Ashe & Nephew Off-Licence, Cardinal, Alan Betts Butchers and Woolworth to name but a few.

This view of Sewells garage is taken from the tower of St. John the Evangelist's Church.

This view of Gordon Sewells garage in the early 1960’s is taken from the tower of St. John the Evangelist’s Church. The former Constitutional Club, seen behind, was at this time being used by Clugstons. Beyond Clugstons is the Library building which was opened by Joseph Cliff 17th February 1904.

Youngsters Cole Street

Youngsters Toy shop on Cole Street

Fox & Goodhall's shop at the corner of Burn Road and Scotter Road.

Fox & Goodhall’s shop at the corner of Burn Road and Scotter Road in the mid 1970’s. The shop was extended to the right in the early 1980’s and currently houses the Post Office.  Prior to (John) Fox & Goodhall owning the shop it had previously been known as Cook’s. At the time of this photograph the Post Office was situated to the right of the shop and Mr. Gerry Robertson was Postmaster for a while. At the back of the shop was a butchery section run by Brian Hatfield and Alan Freyer, the butcher later moved into the small shop seen to the left of the main shop.  The shop changed hands in the 1980’s and was owned by Keith MacArthur – it was later bought by Athwal who currently runs the shop.

Skippingdale Retail Park in 1985 featuring Madeley's, MFI and Valances among others.

Skippingdale Retail Park in 1985 featuring Madeley’s, MFI and Valances among others.

Brian Lee Ltd

Many motorcyclists will remember Brian Lee Ltd seen here on Mary Street in 1980

cole-street-early-1960-c

A view along Cole Street in the early 1960s – the shop on the right (without the canopy) is Charles G Smith’s

bread-strike-november-1978

The Hot Bread Kitchen in the precinct in November 1978, the large queue was a result of the national ‘Bread Strike’

cynthia

Cynthia’s Hairdressers, 1964. Located at 60 Mary Street the shop won a Civic Trust Award for the design of its shop front. Cynthia Hinchcliffe was the salon proprietor. She was married to David Hinchcliffe and she would be often seen visiting relatives, George and Rose Peart, on Cole Street.

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